Being a Mom is Hard. My Aha!! Moment.

I love profound Aha! Moments. Even when they’re painful. Maybe especially when they’re painful. Last week, I posted about learning my element and how it profoundly altered how I do everything. But the heart-sear, gut-punch moment came when I looked up my boys’ elements. First, I looked up hubs. He’s Earth. That made perfect sense. He’s stable, strong, immovable, and it takes about a million years for me to wear him down with my incessant fluidity in all things. I’m in constant motion with every aspect of our lives and he’s a solid marble boulder, contentedly standing strong through the raging rapids I send at him. Our youngest son is the same, but parenting Earth is a challenge when I’m trying to get that same solid landform to put on some socks and hurry the hell up so we won’t be late. But he’s also convicted and strong and fiercely loyal. The big Aha! came as I found my oldest’s element. He is Fire. I sagged beneath the weight of what that meant with my Water. Suddenly, I realized why I can extinguish his light with a simple phrase, or why the tone of my voice impacts him so deeply. When I say things to him, they don’t wash over him like they do with the other two. They wipe out his existence. Mom. Guilt. Moment. Ugh. I sat with the knowledge for a moment and really soaked it in. Knowledge is power. Now that I know our elements, I can choose my words wisely. I’m a giant failure at “Love is Patient, Love is Kind…” so it’s something...

How Learning My Element Changed Everything About How I Write, Parent, and Set Goals.

Water, Earth, Wind and Fire. No, not the 70s band–though they did put out some serious excellence. I’m talking the real elements. Over the weekend, I was researching the Feng Shui charts to make sure a character had set up her camping site correctly (seriously, a complete benefit of being a pantster is that I never have any idea what in the world these characters are going to do next.) As happens 95% of the time I’m anywhere near the internet, I fell down a rabbit hole and found out some amazing things about elements. I’ve always believed that my element was water, it grounds me, makes me more creative, and just gives me an overwhelming sense of peace. I’ll never forget the first time I stood on a boat headed out to sea. A calm settled over me and I felt like I’d finally come home. Even though I’d always known that on a subconscious level, I had no idea that the Chinese believe that we are all born to a certain element. I wasn’t surprised to learn that mine is water, and then of course I followed the rabbit trail deeper and looked up my family’s. (Check back for a post on that, because holy cow did I have an aha moment or 12!) Somehow, the confirmation that my element is water made me want to dive deeper into what that┬ámeant and as I’ve journaled about it this week looking for answers, I’ve gained some incredible insight. Water must keep moving. To stop is to stagnate, pickup and transmit disease, mold, death. Water is powerful, capable of...
Flood Insurance

Flood Insurance

Did you know there’s landslide insurance? Did you know it’s not the same as flood insurance? I had no idea. But you can bet your britches I’m doing the homework today. Right now, Utah’s snow pack is at the 1983 level when City Creek flooded and turned State Street (image) into a river. Our city officials in Herriman think we’re out of the danger zone, unless we get another 140 year storm (which seem to occur every 2 years around here). But the rest of the valley is in severe flooding danger. The biggest thing I noticed when the basement flooded last month was that I was so busy trying to control the water (which was a slow drip) I didn’t have much time to transport items. I moved them out of the way, but in the event of a massive flow of water, I would have had to choose between stopping the water, and moving the items. If we have any [more] rivers overflow their banks this Spring, I fear a high number of homes are going to be impacted. Back to my original question. When dirt/soil/earth [mud] is put in motion by water, it gets treated differently by insurance companies. How does your insurance company treat it? Are you covered? Share...

Rainwater Harvester – Video

Great way to harvest rainwater with a brilliant manifold connecting all the barrels for about $50 and 220 gallons. NOTE: A friend of mine mentioned water laws, and since that sounded like something my state would have, I looked it up. Until May of 2010 it was illegal to harvest rainwater (WTF?) but here’s the deal now: Rainwater harvesting is now legal in the state of Utah, starting May 11 2010. Senate Bill 32 was approved in the 2010 session that provides for the collection and use of precipitation without obtaining a water right after registering with the Division of Water Rights. There is no charge for registration. Storage is limited to one underground 2500 gallon container or two above ground 100 gallon containers. Collection and use are limited to the same parcel of land owned or leased by the rainwater collector. CRAZY! What are the laws in your state? Share...